Wednesday, January 07, 2015

One Last Time Q&A

beautiful books, by moi
S.F., Leslie, & Myrtle (from 3FS) tagged me the "One Last Time Q&A" quiz. Thank you all so much, I loved doing this one.

R U L E S
1. You Must be tagged to take the Q&A quiz
2. You must tag (notify) at least three other bloggers (or whatever they are on) for this Q&A
3. You must answer the following questions to the best of your ability
4. You must have seen The Battle of the Five Armies to be tagged/take the quiz

Answers following questions three and four contain spoilers if you have not seen The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies, or have not read the book The Hobbit, by Tolkien. (Go, read the book.)


Q U E S T I O N S
 1. Tell your story of how you came to see the movie(s) or got into Tolkien in the first place.
When I was about five my whole family listened to The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings on adudiobook, narrated by Rob Ingles. I'm adding his name because I couldn't love his reading of Tolkien's books more. (Here's a sample from youtube. And just because it's awesome, here's Song of the Lonely Mountain as sung by Rob Inglis to Tolkien's original tune.) I've listened to both books over and over, and I love them. I read The Hobbit for myself, but I've never read The Lord of the Rings straight through, though I have read sections. I started reading the Silmarillion, Children of Hurin, and Book of Lost Tales, but haven't gotten at all far in any of them except Children of Hurin. Tolkien's awesome but he's not the easiest to read. I'd like to work on reading them this year.
When I was seven-or-eight-ish my family watched The Lord of the Rings (extended edition - it's better by far than the theatrical version) together. And I loved it, too.

2. Who are your three favorite characters in The Hobbit Trilogy?
Bilbo, Gandalf & Bard.


via, via & via

3. Did you cry in The Battle of the Five Armies, and if so, which scene(s) and what type (sniffling, sobbing, choke-crying)? 
Teary-sniffling, yes: The scene with Bard and Bain up in the watch tower, when Bard said, look at me, son (I can't remember the exact quote - anyone?). When Thranduil accuses Bilbo of rescuing the dwarves from his dungeons and Bard looks at Bilbo and smiles in a sort of wonder and surprise; I don't know why that made me teary-eyed, probably because of how Gandalf is always saying that hobbits have more in them than meets the eye. When Fili dies, and when Thorin makes his peace with Bilbo and dies. And after the great battle when Gandalf and Bilbo sit together on the broken steps. When Thranduil tells Legolass how his mother died. And then how beautiful the scenery is as Bilbo and Gandalf make their way back to the Shire, in such contrast to the scenes before and to the battle.


Isn't this awesome? via
4. Were the deaths compelling to you, and if so, whose?
Yes: Thorin and Fili's were. And - something I hadn't been expecting - Smaug's was too. He's so big and powerful and angry, and then, one arrow. Kili's, sadly, wasn't as much.

5. Overall, were you satisfied with the movie itself?
Overall, yes.

6. Describe the movie in one word.
Epic.

N O M I N E E S
Hannah
Hamlette

(If anyone else would like to do this just say so in a comment and I'll add you here.)

32 comments:

  1. This is awesome! I need to get those audiobooks. And thank you so much for tagging me! I'd love to do this sometime!

    Also: Agreed. Extended Editions are superior. I refuse to watch non-extended! :)

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    1. I love those audiobooks, I bet you'd like them. :) It'll be fun to read your answers, whenever you do it!

      *high fives* Hooray for extended editions! *cheers*

      xx

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  2. This is such a fun tag! I've actually never read LOTR but it seems like a big deal here in the blogging world! I just may have to read it -- do you recommend the books?

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    1. Yeah, LOTR is certainly a big deal for those who've read it, and I definitely recommend the books. :) I hope you read them sometime. :) They're good, and some of the best. :) And, by the way, if you're interested in the movies: they're more enjoyable and mean more if you've read the books first before watching them (I think so, anyway). (Ooo, I just found The Fellowship of the Ring - that's the first book of LOTR - audiobook on youtube, it's here if you want to listen ;). The first bit is introduction but you could skip that.)

      Have an awesome day, Arushee!

      xx

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    2. Ooh, thank you so much for your reply! I'll definitely check them out -- both the books and movies! :)

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    3. Awesome! I'm so glad you're interested in LOTR! :)

      xox

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  3. Ugh this post is so feelzy and I love it. I had forgotten about the part where Thranduil looks at Bilbo in wonder-surprise, but you're right, that was really quite touching. What a fun tag

    Chloe | https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/dc/0e/f7/dc0ef7ce4a157d0ffec9f84c28ebcdea.jpg

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    1. Ooops, wrong link:) Here we go;

      Chloe | Curious Ramblings

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    2. Sometimes I just can't help the feelz, and wouldn't if I could. ;) I love that scene, I'm so glad you do too!

      Thanks for commenting, Chloe! <3

      xx

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  4. This new posters for Battle of Five Armies were so cool..I was so excited when I saw these the very first time :D

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    1. I know! They're so cool, I love face close-ups.

      xx

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  5. Ahh, yes! "The Book of Lost Tales!" Have you read "Farmer Giles of Ham" yet?

    -Max

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    1. *cheers internally for Tolkien fans* No I haven't! I just looked it up and it looks funny. :) Would you recommend it?

      xx

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    2. Yes! One of the few great dragon stories left in this world!

      -Max

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    3. Sounds good. :)

      xx

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  6. Ooh! I just watched the movie! :) It was such a great ending; I cried a lot. :)

    xoxo Morning

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    1. I agree, it was such a great ending. yeah, about the crying. ;) I'm so glad you liked it too. :)

      xx

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  7. (If you tag me, I'll do this.)

    We have the same 3 fave characters in the Hobbit trilogy! Only in reverse order: I love Bard mostest, then Gandalf, then Bilbo.

    I had only liked the first two Hobbit movies okay, but then TBOTFA blew me completely away, so much so that I went back to see it again a week later, and now I understand so much better all the things Peter Jackson & Co were doing with the other two -- I can see the whole character arcs for Bilbo and Thorin, and everything in the first two makes so much more sense now!

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    1. Aw, really? :) Actually I wasn't putting the their names in order, that didn't occur to me; but Bard is - at the moment - my especial favorite of the three.

      I think I like this last best as well. And yes about the character arcs! That was one reason I liked this one so much - everything pulled together and the characters made sense. The character that stood out to me most in that way was Thranduil, I'd not liked him before, but not so now. I loved that last scene with Legolas and him (not the part of the conversation when they talk about Aragorn but the rest of it and when he tells Legolas how his mom died).
      I'm still not overly fond of Thorin but that's already beginning to change. I'm re-listening to The Hobbit audiobook, I hadn't heard the original story for a long time, and didn't remember how different the dwarves are, but they're the same in some aspects. Like Thorin's pride.
      I love BOFA so much. And I hope I can see it again sometime, not too far along, hopefully! :)

      xx

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    2. Bard. Bard is wonderful, isn't he? Stalwart and grim and dependable and firm.

      I actually loved the part where Thranduil told Legolas to seek Aragorn. I was like, "Whoa! So this is how Legolas ends up hanging out with Aragorn!"

      I hope you get to see it again soon!

      Thanks for the tag! I'lm working on my answers...

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    3. Yes. He is. And perfect choice of adjectives. And isn't Luke Evans is perfect as Bard?

      It was a nice tie-in to Lord of the Rings, I just didn't like how Thranduil said to Legolas that he had to find out Strider's real name for himself. It just seemed, or the way it was phrased seemed...unnecessary? cheesy?

      Oh, good! I know I'll enjoy reading them. :)

      xx

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    4. I couldn't ask for a more perfect Bard.

      I liked that Thranduil said that, though, because then people who might not have seen the LOTR movies or read the books won't be spoiled as to Strider's identity. And the reveal at the Council of Elrond will still be a, "Whoa!" moment for them. Also, Aragorn clearly isn't marching around telling people who he really is, so Thranduil was kind of like, "You're gonna have to get close to this dude and get him to trust you -- this is an actual challenge." Dunno, just liked it.

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    5. Nor could I.

      You have a point there about it being a sort of challenge, but it still felt worded awkwardly or non-Tolkienish-ly to me. The thought of people watching the movies first without having read the books makes me sad, honestly, and if you've already read the books you know who Strider is. But then in the books (if I remember correctly) it's a surprise when you learn who Strider really is; so the movies saving that surprise for the correct timing would be in line with the books, even if it's unnecessary because people already know. But isn't Aragorn mentioned in The Hobbit somewhere? But then he may just be called Strider then too....

      It's fun to share thoughts about TLOTR/The Hobbit. :)

      xx

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    6. I did a bit of digging on line this morning, and if you're strictly following Tolkien's timeline, Aragorn himself might not have known his true identity yet -- he was probably only about 10 years old at the time of the Battle of the Five Armies. Elrond didn't tell him his true identity until he came of age 10 years later. Which would mean Thranduil could not tell Legolas his name because Aragorn wasn't supposed to know yet either! (Which does make him calling Aragorn "a young Ranger" a little off -- he's still a kid. But the LOTR movie audiences would respond to the word "ranger" and name "Strider," not to talking about a kid living in Rivendell called Estel. (More info here and here.)

      And I'm sorry the thought of people watching the movies first makes you sad, because if I had never seen the movies, I would never have read the books. And the Hobbit movies have made me actually like that book.

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    7. Then I take it back; if the movies made you read the books I'm glad you watched them first. I'd gotten the impression that seeing the movies first without having read the books turned people away from the books, that was what had happened for the few other people I know who watched the movies first. That's why I said the it made me sad, but apparently I was wrong about that, or at least it's not always the case, so if you read 'em 'cause you'd watched 'em first I'm glad you watched them first.

      I have this vague memory of Gandalf telling Frodo in LOTR about how he and Aragorn/Strider had hunted Gollum and I thought it took place around the time of The Hobbit, but I'm not so sure now. Okay, I just read the things you linked to and that happened later.... Somewhere in the movies - I think it was Return of the King - Aragorn tells Eowyn that he's 87 years old, and I think The Hobbit takes place 60 years before LOTR (Bilbo is 51 by the end of The Hobbit and 111 in LOTR), which would make him 27.... But whatever. I really hope I'm not being an annoying argumentative person, I don't mean to be. I like talking about it, that's all. :)

      xx

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    8. You're not the only person I've seen that thinks that way -- that people content them with the movies and never explore the books. As for me, if I love a story and its characters, I want MORE, and the books are where the more is, so I'll absolutely try the books.

      Okay, yes, the math does not always work for the movies. Because in the books, remember, a LOT of time goes by between Bilbo leaving the Shire and going to live in Rivendell and Frodo leaving with the ring. Like, 20 years. Frodo goes from being barely of age to 50. But in the movies, they zip that up to be just a matter of weeks or months, so he's still like 30. And then all the other reckonings of people's ages and stuff doesn't work out right. Like, Aragorn should have been 67 when Bilbo turned 111, and then 87 by the time Frodo sets out, and then Bilbo would have been 131.

      But anyway, yes, Aragorn hunted Gollum and captured him (says something about how Gollum will never love him because he was not kind to him) and took him to Lothlorien, where Gollum was held captive until he escaped. That was not long before the stuff in FOTR happens though.

      And nope, I don't think you're being argumentative! You just are passionate about LOTR, as am I :-)

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    9. Then from now on I'll focus more on encouraging people who've enjoyed the movies to read the books. :)

      I didn't realize the timelines were different in the movie than in the book! Wow, that makes sense then. You know your stuff. :) *bows out*

      Oh, good! I was rather worried.... :/ By the way, thanks for your long comments, Hamlette, I love them. :D

      xx

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    10. Just checked again, and it's 17 years between Bilbo leaving and Gandalf coming back to confirm that this ring is the One Ring. But not in the movie, there it's not long at all. I didn't realize that for a while, either. And I'd forgotten it again until this discussion, where it finally occured to me that that was why all my math was off, hee.

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  8. SW--
    I love your answers! You did a brilliant job in answering. My family owns a copy of "the Annotated Hobbit" just like yours. :) What a wonderful Middle-earth book collection you have!
    ~ S. F.

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    1. Thank you, S.F! How nice to know that we (or our families) own the exact same copies of such wonderful books. :)

      xx

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